Aimee Loiselle https://www.aimeeloiselle.com Wed, 21 Jul 2021 17:20:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 194806127 2021-2022: Faculty Fellow, Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration, Yale University https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/2021-2022-faculty-fellow-center-for-the-study-of-race-indigeneity-and-transnational-migration-yale-university/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2021-2022-faculty-fellow-center-for-the-study-of-race-indigeneity-and-transnational-migration-yale-university Tue, 20 Jul 2021 02:19:28 +0000 https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/?p=2095 The Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration (RITM) is a university-wide, interdisciplinary academic research center. The Director of the RITM Center is Stephen Pitti,  Professor of History, American Studies, and Ethnicity, Race, & Migration. The mission of RITM is to...

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The Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration (RITM) is a university-wide, interdisciplinary academic research center. The Director of the RITM Center is Stephen Pitti,  Professor of History, American Studies, and Ethnicity, Race, & Migration. The mission of RITM is to advance rigorous, innovative research and teaching on key topics of historical and contemporary importance. Building upon Yale’s longstanding strengths, RITM fosters intellectual exchanges that cross institutional, disciplinary, and geographic borders; enrich and challenge academic fields; and foreground perspectives often underrepresented in university and policy circles. Faculty Fellows meet to discuss their research and offer Lunch Series talks during the year.

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2021 August: Assistant Professor of History, Central Connecticut State University https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/2021-august-assistant-professor-of-history-central-connecticut-state-university/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2021-august-assistant-professor-of-history-central-connecticut-state-university Fri, 02 Jul 2021 17:06:00 +0000 https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/?p=2099 I joined the History Department at CCSU in New Britain for the 2021-2022 academic year.

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I joined the History Department at CCSU in New Britain for the 2021-2022 academic year.

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2021 April: “Beyond the Fields: Gender, Labor, and the Public Legacies of Puerto Rican Farm Workers and Needleworkers,” Shade Research Collective Symposium https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/april-2021-shade-research-collective-symposium-power-migration-and-culture-in-the-tobacco-valley/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=april-2021-shade-research-collective-symposium-power-migration-and-culture-in-the-tobacco-valley Fri, 30 Apr 2021 06:00:57 +0000 https://aneeqdesigns.com/aimee/?p=1118 April 2021 Shade Research Collective Symposium: Power, Migration, and Culture in the Tobacco Valley. My presentation “Beyond the Fields: Gender, Labor, and the Public Legacies of Puerto Rican Farm Workers and Needleworkers” begins at 2:02:20.

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April 2021 Shade Research Collective Symposium: Power, Migration, and Culture in the Tobacco Valley. My presentation “Beyond the Fields: Gender, Labor, and the Public Legacies of Puerto Rican Farm Workers and Needleworkers” begins at 2:02:20.

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2021 February: How Aimee Loiselle Does History, Contingent Magazine https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/news-1/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=news-1 Wed, 07 Apr 2021 19:44:11 +0000 https://aneeqdesigns.com/aimee/?p=725 2021 February, “How Aimee Loiselle Does History,” Contingent Magazine Contingent is a non-profit history magazine. Its writers are adjuncts, museum workers, independent scholars—all people who work outside the tenure-track professoriate. Contingent is rooted in three principles: History is for everyone. Every way of doing history is worthwhile. Historians...

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2021 February, “How Aimee Loiselle Does History,” Contingent Magazine

Contingent is a non-profit history magazine. Its writers are adjuncts, museum workers, independent scholars—all people who work outside the tenure-track professoriate. Contingent is rooted in three principles: History is for everyone. Every way of doing history is worthwhile. Historians should be paid for their work.

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Podcast #1 https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/podcast-1/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=podcast-1 Tue, 06 Apr 2021 15:50:07 +0000 https://aneeqdesigns.com/aimee/?p=344 344 2020 November: Catherine Prelinger Award, Coordinating Council for Women in History https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/2020-november-catherine-prelinger-award-council-for-women-in-history/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2020-november-catherine-prelinger-award-council-for-women-in-history Sat, 07 Nov 2020 02:00:28 +0000 https://aneeqdesigns.com/aimee/?p=727 The CCWH Prelinger Award is a scholarship of $20,000 awarded to a scholar of excellence. This award, named for Catherine Prelinger, a former CCWH president and nontraditional scholar, is intended to enhance the work of a contemporary scholar whose academic path has not followed the traditional...

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The CCWH Prelinger Award is a scholarship of $20,000 awarded to a scholar of excellence. This award, named for Catherine Prelinger, a former CCWH president and nontraditional scholar, is intended to enhance the work of a contemporary scholar whose academic path has not followed the traditional path of uninterrupted study, moving from completed secondary, to undergraduate, then graduate degrees, followed by a tenure-track faculty position. These funds were originally granted to CCWH by an anonymous donor in honor of the work this organization has devoted to exploring women’s history, encouraging opportunities for women in the profession, and in educating young women to pursue careers in history. It’s intended to enhance the ability of the recipient to carry on these traditions through contributions to women in history.

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2020 November: Commentary for Springfield Democratic City Committee, Virtual Election Night Coverage https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/2020-november-commentary-for-springfield-democratic-city-committee-virtual-election-night-coverage/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2020-november-commentary-for-springfield-democratic-city-committee-virtual-election-night-coverage Thu, 30 Apr 2020 02:00:29 +0000 https://aneeqdesigns.com/aimee/?p=864 2020 November: Commentary for Springfield Democratic City Committee, Virtual Election Night Coverage The moderators for Election Night Coverage requested my commentary regarding the significance of unfolding results, particularly for the issues of U.S. workers and global supply chains, reproductive justice, and recent history of presidential politics.

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2020 November: Commentary for Springfield Democratic City Committee, Virtual Election Night Coverage

The moderators for Election Night Coverage requested my commentary regarding the significance of unfolding results, particularly for the issues of U.S. workers and global supply chains, reproductive justice, and recent history of presidential politics.

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2020 April: Lerner-Scott Prize, Organization of American Historians https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/2020-april-lerner-scott-prize-organization-of-american-historians/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2020-april-lerner-scott-prize-organization-of-american-historians Thu, 30 Apr 2020 02:00:28 +0000 https://aneeqdesigns.com/aimee/?p=866 2020 April: Lerner-Scott Prize, Organization of American Historians My project “Creating Norma Rae: The Erasure of Puerto Rican Needleworkers and Southern Labor Activists in a Neoliberal Icon” received the Lerner-Scott Prize for the best doctoral dissertation in U.S. women’s history. The prize committee described it as “a stunningly...

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2020 April: Lerner-Scott PrizeOrganization of American Historians

My project “Creating Norma Rae: The Erasure of Puerto Rican Needleworkers and Southern Labor Activists in a Neoliberal Icon” received the Lerner-Scott Prize for the best doctoral dissertation in U.S. women’s history. The prize committee described it as “a stunningly successful combination of original scholarship, compelling prose, and sophisticated argumentation.” I am so appreciative for all the scholars, librarians, archivists, and friends who supported, guided, and advised me on this project. And I am so appreciative for all the people who have developed and enriched the field of U.S. women’s history.

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2020 October: Commentary for The Hill, Mother Jones Biography https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/2020-october-commentary-for-the-hill-mother-jones-biography/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2020-october-commentary-for-the-hill-mother-jones-biography Thu, 30 Apr 2020 02:00:04 +0000 https://aneeqdesigns.com/aimee/?p=865 2020 October: Commentary for The Hill, Mother Jones Biography A reporter for The Hill, a news website based in Washington, D.C., that serves readers interested in federal government and national issues, contacted me for commentary on the labor activist Mother Jones. The piece is part of its Century...

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2020 October: Commentary for The HillMother Jones Biography

A reporter for The Hill, a news website based in Washington, D.C., that serves readers interested in federal government and national issues, contacted me for commentary on the labor activist Mother Jones. The piece is part of its Century of the Woman series to celebrate women’s activism, organizing, achievements, and leadership.

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Hot Topic – Reduce Fires in the Amazon with Jobs https://www.aimeeloiselle.com/everything-is-designed-few-things-are-designed-well/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=everything-is-designed-few-things-are-designed-well Mon, 26 Aug 2019 08:30:00 +0000 https://artem-demo.bslthemes.com/?p=281 The fires in the Amazon throughout Brazil and Bolivia reveal the inability of environmental activists, climate change organizations, and worker groups to forge effective alliances. Most of these fires started around logging, mining, and ranching operations—big money industries that extract billions in natural resources. Their imperative is to...

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The fires in the Amazon throughout Brazil and Bolivia reveal the inability of environmental activists, climate change organizations, and worker groups to forge effective alliances. Most of these fires started around logging, mining, and ranching operations—big money industries that extract billions in natural resources. Their imperative is to make more money, not to preserve the basics necessary for human societies. They want forests cleared and pay poor people to do their illegal work.

These operations of extraction have roots that trace to the early 1500s, when Europeans started to divide and industrialize the natural resources in South America. The Portuguese and Spanish arrived, followed by the English, Dutch, and French. They viewed the colonies as places for extracting gold, silver, sugar, coffee, and other returns on land investments. That model depended on slave labor. When indigenous peoples refused to work and disappeared due to a variety of causes (running to remote regions, epidemics, cruelty and massacres), the Portuguese and Spanish built an Atlantic African slave trade. The English and French intensified that slave labor regime.

Current situations with logging, mining, and ranching have to be understood as the legacy of colonial extraction as well as a modern practice of global corporations. So they have to be understood in terms of labor. These sprawling industrialized operations reach far beyond and destroy ecosystems faster than what anyone could have imagined 50 years ago, let alone 500 years. But some basic principles are consistent—the labor remains exploitative, cruel, and serves remote investors far more than the local communities. Cut off two sources of that labor: the desperation of poor people to survive and the drive of working people to have stable jobs.

Poor working people need income if they do not have arable land or other access to resources. They will take jobs with regional managers for these massive operations, often men of a similar ethnicity who appear to offer good things. Environmental activists and climate change organizations that press for immediate fire control and industrial bans cannot fight the illegal and widespread destruction until they create viable and meaningful options for the working poor. They do the hard labor, including the burning and cutting of the Amazon forests, for these immense extractive corporations with investors from around the world.

Residents can understand the catastrophe; global outcry can condemn the industries; political elites can obstruct Brazil’s president; climate change scientists can expound on the data; governments with revenues can pay for firefighting. All necessary in the short term—then working poor people need sustainable economic development. The indigenous peoples understand and assert these interconnections, so they block industrial equipment, demand government oversight and protections, and actively preserve their social and cultural practices that give their communities sustenance and survival in all ways.

We cannot mimic or appropriate the ways of indigenous peoples. But we can shift our organizing to their model, with its sustainable living practices for everyone. That includes reliable ways for working poor people to have meaningful existence. Not temporary training, not random grunt work or Sisyphean cleanup jobs—sustainable meaningful work in local farming, renewable energy, public transportation, environmental conservation, ecosystem rehabilitation. Such efforts will take a massive coalition that encompasses unions and worker groups, a substantive plan, relentless outreach to rural villages, a platform to oust the current right-wing Brazilian government, and increased taxes as well as private fundraising.  Corruption will happen, as it always does—then correct and move forward with decades of consistent efforts to sustain the links between jobs for working poor and nurturing the Amazon rainforests.

The goal of a designer is to listen, observe, understand, sympathize, empathize, synthesize, and glean insights that enable him or her to make the invisible visible.

Andrew Grove

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